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Jul71-Oct74 Offline
#1 Posted : Friday, 20 December 2019 3:12:17 AM(UTC)
Jul71-Oct74

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Hi All
Has anyone used this type of product in their cooling system? Any advice on pros or cons? Just trying to help my old girl have the best chance of coping with the heat.
Thanks for any advice/ experiences
Rick
Balfizar Offline
#2 Posted : Friday, 20 December 2019 10:13:23 AM(UTC)
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I use this and find it to be effective at trackdays

Penrite 10 Tenths Race Coolant Inhibitor Premix Anti-freeze & Coolants 5L
Part No. RCIPMX005
Race Coolant Inhibitor premix is a Type “B”, non glycol based coolant and inhibitor premix, that effectively lowers engine temperatures whilst providing maximum protection against corrosion, cavitation, scaling and oxidation for up to 5 years or 150,000 Kilometres.

APPLICATION
Race Coolant Inhibitor Premix is formulated for all water cooled engines, especially where high engine operating temperatures are experienced. It provides superior heat transfer abilities to lower engine running temperatures compared to glycol based engine coolants.

Race Coolant Inhibitor Premix can be used as a conventional on road coolant inhibitor in Everyday vehicles and in competition and race vehicles where glycol based products are banned. It has an extremely effective wetting agent that reduces cavitation and heat spot areas inside the engine, allowing for lower running temperatures and preventing engine damage from overheating.

Race Coolant Inhibitor Premix uses a Hybrid inhibitor system that provides complete engine coolant protection against all types of corrosion, cavitation, scaling and lime deposit for up to 5 years or 150,000 km* if kept at the premix dosage concentration. It is Compatible with all types of metal including magnesium, aluminium, Brass, Bronze & Copper as well as all plastics and rubber hoses.

DOSAGE
Product is used directly from the bottle
Further Dilution is not required
Please Note

Do Not mix with other coolants or other types of coolants
For best results - Prior to using, Flush out Cooling System using Penrite Radiator Flush.
This product is Not Compatible for testing with glycol coolant Test Strips as false readings can occur.
PRODUCT BENEFITS
Lowers engine operating temperatures preventing damage
Leaves no slippery residue if dropped on a race track.
Contains a conventional Hybrid inhibitor
Removes cavitation for better heat dissipation
Compatible with seals, pipes & hoses
Protects all metal types from corrosion
Protects water pumps and seals.
Biodegradable and environmentally friendly.
Lasts up to 5 years or 150,000km.
INDUSTRY & MANUFACTURER'S PERFORMANCE LEVELS
AS 2108-2004 Type B
202tonner Offline
#3 Posted : Friday, 20 December 2019 10:59:12 AM(UTC)
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I used rainwater for many years with no problems.
I use off-the-shelf premixed coolant now. I add Rislone Radiator Stop Leak as a precaution.
I used a "Coolfilter" plastic slotted cone in the radiator hose for years until it broke. There was always a little bit of crap/scale in there whenever I had the hose off. Haven't replaced it as the aftermarket temp gauge lets me know exactly what is happening now.
I always use copper radiators. Not really sure if the ally ones will react badly with cast iron so better safe than sorry.

Other thoughts:
Get a bigger radiator. Overengineering can be good.

Get the whole cooling system flushed.

With a cast iron block it may be worthwhile using a coolant filter of some sort to catch any crap.

Make sure the air path to the radiator is clear. Flyscreen over the grille, spotlights, bullbars can all interfere with the airflow.
castellan Offline
#4 Posted : Friday, 20 December 2019 11:08:36 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Jul71-Oct74 Go to Quoted Post
Hi All
Has anyone used this type of product in their cooling system? Any advice on pros or cons? Just trying to help my old girl have the best chance of coping with the heat.
Thanks for any advice/ experiences
Rick


With a street driven car at the end of the day, a good radiator is what you need and set up correctly.

Many people claim that when you push the engine harder the temp will rise, that's BS ! if it rise above the thermostat setting something is not spot on with the system.

I have driven many a car flat out for hours on end and the temp gauge never moved past where it should be, even on the hottest days Darwin and all. only when the radiator was crap did I see the gauge rise up.

Other than that one just has to drive it easy to keep the temp down if the temp climes up.

If your car runs too hot you loose power and will use more fuel.
castellan Offline
#5 Posted : Friday, 20 December 2019 11:30:47 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: 202tonner Go to Quoted Post
I used rainwater for many years with no problems.
I use off-the-shelf premixed coolant now. I add Rislone Radiator Stop Leak as a precaution.
I used a "Coolfilter" plastic slotted cone in the radiator hose for years until it broke. There was always a little bit of crap/scale in there whenever I had the hose off. Haven't replaced it as the aftermarket temp gauge lets me know exactly what is happening now.
I always use copper radiators. Not really sure if the ally ones will react badly with cast iron so better safe than sorry.

Other thoughts:
Get a bigger radiator. Overengineering can be good.

Get the whole cooling system flushed.

With a cast iron block it may be worthwhile using a coolant filter of some sort to catch any crap.

Make sure the air path to the radiator is clear. Flyscreen over the grille, spotlights, bullbars can all interfere with the airflow.


Many years a go my mum had a HJ 202 and the old man put a new radiator in it, but they had no temp gauge on the bastards, now I knew that she got hot and that it was due to rust scale blocking, as I could see the shit sitting above the tubes clear as day, but old man and his mechanic said it's fine, no it wasn't ! it boiled it's arse off if you started pushing it and the automatic trans oil was black as. that mechanic was a con man prick. all he wanted was the job to repair the auto and engine, how many a 202 would have failed to such idiots.
I got fuel once and asked what that to the mechanic, burnt out valve was the response, I recon it was points and yep I was right, that moron may of got away with such with most.
wbute Offline
#6 Posted : Saturday, 28 December 2019 9:29:38 AM(UTC)
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Theoretically, it shouldn’t make any difference over a proper coolant mix. If your thermostat and cooling system is working correctly, the thermostat will still regulate the temperature that it’s set to.
It supposedly reduces cavitation thereby increasing the ability of the coolant to remove heat and also reduce cavitation in engines prone to cavitation damage, like some wet sleeve diesels I guess.
Remember, the thermostat regulates the temperature in a properly maintained cooling system.
Balfizar Offline
#7 Posted : Sunday, 29 December 2019 1:36:02 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: wbute Go to Quoted Post
Theoretically, it shouldn’t make any difference over a proper coolant mix. If your thermostat and cooling system is working correctly, the thermostat will still regulate the temperature that it’s set to.
It supposedly reduces cavitation thereby increasing the ability of the coolant to remove heat and also reduce cavitation in engines prone to cavitation damage, like some wet sleeve diesels I guess.
Remember, the thermostat regulates the temperature in a properly maintained cooling system.


Once your regulator is fully open, you are at the mercy of water/air flow and heat exchange rates. 10/10ths It provides superior heat transfer abilities to lower engine running temperatures compared to glycol based engine coolants. It has an extremely effective wetting agent that reduces cavitation and heat spot areas inside the engine, allowing for lower running temperatures and preventing engine damage from overheating. A fully functioning (to spec) cooling system will struggle in 49.9 deg C ambient temperature in crawling traffic. Clean radiator, pump flow (impeller cast not pressed), descaled block (reverse flush), operational radiator cap, clean coolant to spec (mix) is a good starting point, 10/10ths is insurance and raises the capacity of the system to disperse heat. I can run between 2k5 and 5k5 rpm for 20 minutes and not put the gauge to 1/2 way on the track- probably more to do with the average speed of over 100kph and 200kph at the end of the straight and yet I struggled to keep under 7/8 on the gauge on the way home in traffic, 10/10th made a big difference going home especially and at the track.
morsesworld Offline
#8 Posted : Monday, 30 December 2019 7:02:07 PM(UTC)
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Hi Guys,
Other Problems that can exist are;
A machined Head creating more heat.
A water pump Impeller corroded or disintegrated by captivation.
A Performance camshaft with the dissy mechanical advance not suited to it.
The Radiator full of crap caused by using some brands of Radiator stop Leak Compounds too many times.
Mechanics on you tube say that most problems of overheating are caused by a radiator cap that's faulty or someone puts an overflow cap on instead of a cap that's meant for no overflow.

A lot of factors can disrupt the fine balance of cooling an engine especially with a Standard radiator.
wbute Offline
#9 Posted : Wednesday, 1 January 2020 7:46:12 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Balfizar Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: wbute Go to Quoted Post
Theoretically, it shouldn’t make any difference over a proper coolant mix. If your thermostat and cooling system is working correctly, the thermostat will still regulate the temperature that it’s set to.
It supposedly reduces cavitation thereby increasing the ability of the coolant to remove heat and also reduce cavitation in engines prone to cavitation damage, like some wet sleeve diesels I guess.
Remember, the thermostat regulates the temperature in a properly maintained cooling system.


Once your regulator is fully open, you are at the mercy of water/air flow and heat exchange rates. 10/10ths It provides superior heat transfer abilities to lower engine running temperatures compared to glycol based engine coolants. It has an extremely effective wetting agent that reduces cavitation and heat spot areas inside the engine, allowing for lower running temperatures and preventing engine damage from overheating. A fully functioning (to spec) cooling system will struggle in 49.9 deg C ambient temperature in crawling traffic. Clean radiator, pump flow (impeller cast not pressed), descaled block (reverse flush), operational radiator cap, clean coolant to spec (mix) is a good starting point, 10/10ths is insurance and raises the capacity of the system to disperse heat. I can run between 2k5 and 5k5 rpm for 20 minutes and not put the gauge to 1/2 way on the track- probably more to do with the average speed of over 100kph and 200kph at the end of the straight and yet I struggled to keep under 7/8 on the gauge on the way home in traffic, 10/10th made a big difference going home especially and at the track.


I disagree about a cooling system struggling at 49 degrees and in slow moving traffic. If the system is designed correctly and maintained, it won’t overheat in those conditions. You only have to look at any stationary engines or slow moving mining equipment to see that this is possible. Cars are tested for all conditions like this before they are released.
The radiator should not be at its limit if the thermostat is open. If your car is not teaching operating temperature or it’s getting hot, you have a problem and it won’t be the type of coolant. It will be design or maintenance. If you actually have a cavitation problem, which until you see what cavitation causes to a diesel liner (the cavitation causes bubbles which actually wear pits in the liners that actually wear right through after about 8000 hours) then I doubt it’s effecting the cooling capacity of your ordinary coolant.
If you increase the power of your engine, then you need to increase the cooling system as well. However, if it’s done correctly it won’t run at anything other than normal operating temp.
If your gauge is going up and down as you drive your car, do you still have the thermostat fitted?
Balfizar Offline
#10 Posted : Wednesday, 1 January 2020 10:49:22 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: wbute Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Balfizar Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: wbute Go to Quoted Post
Theoretically, it shouldn’t make any difference over a proper coolant mix. If your thermostat and cooling system is working correctly, the thermostat will still regulate the temperature that it’s set to.
It supposedly reduces cavitation thereby increasing the ability of the coolant to remove heat and also reduce cavitation in engines prone to cavitation damage, like some wet sleeve diesels I guess.
Remember, the thermostat regulates the temperature in a properly maintained cooling system.


Once your regulator is fully open, you are at the mercy of water/air flow and heat exchange rates. 10/10ths It provides superior heat transfer abilities to lower engine running temperatures compared to glycol based engine coolants. It has an extremely effective wetting agent that reduces cavitation and heat spot areas inside the engine, allowing for lower running temperatures and preventing engine damage from overheating. A fully functioning (to spec) cooling system will struggle in 49.9 deg C ambient temperature in crawling traffic. Clean radiator, pump flow (impeller cast not pressed), descaled block (reverse flush), operational radiator cap, clean coolant to spec (mix) is a good starting point, 10/10ths is insurance and raises the capacity of the system to disperse heat. I can run between 2k5 and 5k5 rpm for 20 minutes and not put the gauge to 1/2 way on the track- probably more to do with the average speed of over 100kph and 200kph at the end of the straight and yet I struggled to keep under 7/8 on the gauge on the way home in traffic, 10/10th made a big difference going home especially and at the track.


I disagree about a cooling system struggling at 49 degrees and in slow moving traffic. If the system is designed correctly and maintained, it won’t overheat in those conditions. You only have to look at any stationary engines or slow moving mining equipment to see that this is possible. Cars are tested for all conditions like this before they are released.
The radiator should not be at its limit if the thermostat is open. If your car is not teaching operating temperature or it’s getting hot, you have a problem and it won’t be the type of coolant. It will be design or maintenance. If you actually have a cavitation problem, which until you see what cavitation causes to a diesel liner (the cavitation causes bubbles which actually wear pits in the liners that actually wear right through after about 8000 hours) then I doubt it’s effecting the cooling capacity of your ordinary coolant.
If you increase the power of your engine, then you need to increase the cooling system as well. However, if it’s done correctly it won’t run at anything other than normal operating temp.
If your gauge is going up and down as you drive your car, do you still have the thermostat fitted?


I have a 47.6% increase in power over a standard 5.0L dual exhaust engine. 126s Kw to 186 Kws the answer to not butchering an all original Brock VH Group III for the occasional extreme weather conditions was to find a more efficient coolant and it almost works or at least gets me home. I monitor all temperatures at the track with IR handheld/trigger temp gauge, radiator temp goes up (initially) on the cool down lap (lower air flow) - bonnet up between sessions and its all good to go again. High ambient temp + airco on is a problem in crawling traffic.
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