Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login or Register.

Notification

Icon
Error

Login


Take the time to read our Privacy Policy.

justgm Offline
#1 Posted : Thursday, 30 May 2019 3:21:29 PM(UTC)
justgm

Rank: Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 30/04/2005(UTC)
Posts: 316
Man
New Zealand

Was thanked: 9 time(s) in 9 post(s)
Hi , I had a call from our local Holden dealer last week , they had an HQ owner that lost the boot key . So I took down all my spare 'B' keys ( I have the "A Key" master set but not the 'B" set) No luck . until I looked in the owner guide and found the key number , which I assume they got a new one cut. Now what does the key number mean?, example key A 6D23 & key B 8A57 .Thanks Mark.
life is good in "Wine & Holden Marlborough "
Dr Terry Offline
#2 Posted : Thursday, 30 May 2019 4:08:43 PM(UTC)
Dr Terry

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Moderator, Registered
Joined: 1/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 5,448

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 69 time(s) in 65 post(s)
An old school locksmith would be the one to ask.

I remember getting keys cut at our local Holden dealer back in the 70s & 80s. We just quoted that number & they would cut the key from that info alone,

Dr Terry
If at first you don't succeed, just call it Version 1.0
Warren Turnbull Offline
#3 Posted : Thursday, 30 May 2019 6:51:46 PM(UTC)
Warren Turnbull

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Registered, Veteran
Joined: 10/02/2009(UTC)
Posts: 2,238

Was thanked: 11 time(s) in 11 post(s)
Yes the key number is a code for the tumblers, any locksmith worth his salt should be able to cut off the number. Was a common way to steal cars back in the day, break into car and check books, then get key cut. Drive away no damage to ignition if you were going to rebirth.

The same is still true today, each key number is listed in the owner info.

Alternatively it is easy to open the boot and take the lock out and send it away.

Edited by user Thursday, 30 May 2019 6:52:48 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

commodorenut Offline
#4 Posted : Thursday, 30 May 2019 8:09:22 PM(UTC)
commodorenut

Rank: Veteran

Reputation:

Groups: Moderator, Registered, Veteran
Joined: 2/03/2005(UTC)
Posts: 3,105

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 29 time(s) in 28 post(s)
Some key codes relate directly to the bitting depth - ie how many tumblers or leaves in the lock, and how deep each one is on a set scale (often 5 or 6 different depths).

Other codes aren't written so basic, and need a lookup table to ascertain the code. From my experience with Commodore keys, which evolved from HQ keys, these tables are published to locksmiths and dealers, and there's something like 6-8 pages of them. There's simply not enough paper to list every code, but the tables explain how the letter comes into it, and how to extrapolate the 5-digit bitting code from the key code.

I remember learning about this back in 1993 with my father's VK. I'd driven it over to a mate's place for a weekend BBQ/party.
The key (a cut copy made from brass) got bent when unsuccessfully fielding a backyard cricket catch, and broke when I tried to straighten it.
By good fortune, the father of one of the guys there (his neighbour) was a locksmith, with the full kit in the back of a van.
We took the 2 bits of key to him, and he shook his head, but asked if we had the books for the car.
He looked up the key number, went to his workshop, and came back with the cut key, ready to go.

He explained the key cutting matrix system to me - ie basically a grid of length & depth to position each cut, and some of the intricacies - like you can't have a real shallow cut beside a real deep one. and how a worn lock or key can allow many "near" combinations to operate it. He was one of those old school guys Terry mentioned - and as typical with older tradesmen, they love to share their knowledge to anyone from a younger generation who shows interest.

I found this page that covers similar locks to the HQ, used in US GM cars: http://www.camaros.org/keysandlocks.shtml
Cheers,

Mick
_______________________________________________________________

Judge a successful man not on how he treats his peers, but on how he treats those less fortunate.
Users browsing this topic
Guest
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Powered by YAF | YAF © 2003-2019, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 0.163 seconds.