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rememberholden Offline
#1 Posted : Sunday, 8 March 2020 1:47:49 PM(UTC)
rememberholden

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Australia
Location: Brisbane

Hi, first time posting here. I've tried searching the forum for solutions no no avail.

In a nut shell, my diesel only starts using starter fluid ('start ya bastard' brand). I have to spray a short squirt into the turbo. When I crank it doesn't seem to get any fuel. After using starter fluid it starts and runs fine. After it's hot it will usually restart again without starter fluid, but if I let it cool down too long I need to repeat the process.

What could be causing this? I already had a mechanic the primary fuel/water separator, and he said the fuel pump had loose connections which he fixed. I also replaced the fuel filter on the engine but then I ran injector cleaner through the tank, could this have clogged it up already? Something about fuel tank algae?

From scouring other websites about other engines, some people suggest it could be sensor related, ie not injecting fuel when I crank...? A search of ebay for sensors has everything from vacuum valve to air flow meter or exhaust gas return sensors... ranging from $25 up to hundreds! I don't want to randomly start replacing sensors.

Does anyone have any idea why this engine isn't getting fuel when I crank it over?

TIA!
Dr Terry Offline
#2 Posted : Monday, 9 March 2020 9:03:19 AM(UTC)
Dr Terry

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It may be getting fuel on crank, but not enough for cold start. That's what the glow plugs are for.

It may just be faulty glow plugs. Get a pro to check it out.

Dr Terry
If at first you don't succeed, just call it Version 1.0
wbute Offline
#3 Posted : Monday, 9 March 2020 6:44:29 PM(UTC)
wbute

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One thing that’s for sure, stop using ether! You will end up melting a piston.
It could be any number of things. When a diesel gets hard to start, it may be still getting plenty of fuel but the injectors could be producing a poor spray pattern. If you put an injector on a testing bench and try to light the fuel from a poorly performing one, it will actually put the flame out,where as a good one will create an effect the same as lighting a aerosol van with a lighter.
The ether is igniting and that gets the engine running fast enough to burn the poorly injected fuel. That’s why all American produced machinery comes with a ether can system and remote button from new, for cold winter starts.
As Dr Terry says, go someone who knows, the cost of using ether will end up being more than your car is worth.
wbute Offline
#4 Posted : Monday, 9 March 2020 7:19:25 PM(UTC)
wbute

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Diesel and petrol engines, whilst both internal combustion, don’t really have much in common.
There are two types of diesels, indirect injection and direct injection. Direct injection, whilst often having glow plugs, will really never need to use them in Australia. Indirect will need them nearly all the time when starting cold. An old land cruiser with a 2H is indirect, hence often not starting when the glow plugs pack it in. Your Rodeo and nearly all modern diesels are direct injection and have glow plugs but realistically you never actually leave the key on the three seconds to actually let them glow up. How often do you actually leave the key on till the squiggly glow plug icon actually goes off? I never have in any D4D Toyota I have owned.
Remember that the common rail system had nothing to do with direct or indirect engines, it’s just a more efficient way of metering the fuel, compared to old rotary or inline diesel fuel injection pumps. The actual engine design is still the same.
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